Tag: women

Women in Menopause Are Getting Short Shrift

After a decade working as an obstetrician-gynecologist, Marci Bowers thought she understood menopause. Whenever she saw a patient in her 40s or 50s, she knew to ask about things such as hot flashes, vaginal dryness, mood swings, and memory problems. And no matter what a patient’s concern was, Bowers almost always ended up prescribing the same thing. “Our answer was always estrogen,” she told me.

Then, in the mid-2000s, Bowers took over a gender-affirmation surgical practice in Colorado. In her new role, she began consultations by asking each patient what they wanted from their body—a question she’d never been trained to ask menopausal women. Over time, she grew comfortable bringing up tricky topics such as pleasure, desire, and sexuality, and prescribing testosterone as well as estrogen. That’s when she realized: Women in menopause were getting short shrift.

Menopause is a body-wide hormonal transition that affects virtually every organ, from skin to bones to brain. The same can be said of gender transition, which, like menopause, is often referred to by doctors and transgender patients as “a second puberty”: a roller coaster of physical and emotional changes, incited by a dramatic shift in hormones. But medicine has only recently begun connecting the dots. In the past few years, some doctors who typically treat transgender patients—urologists, gender-affirmation surgeons, sexual-medicine specialists—have begun moving into menopause care and bringing with them a new set of tools.

“In many ways, trans care is light years ahead of women’s care,” Kelly Casperson, a urologist and certified menopause provider in Washington State, told me. Providers who do both are well versed in the effects of hormones, attuned to concerns about sexual function, and empathetic toward people who have had their symptoms dismissed by providers. If the goal of menopause care isn’t just to help women survive but

How medieval French women used hidden social networks to share medical advice

In the medieval period, medical science was still dominated by the ancient writings of Hippocrates from the fifth century and Galen of Pergamon from the second century. Research has shown that women were increasingly being taken seriously as healers and as bearers of wisdom about women’s bodies and health. But despite this, men were preferred while women faced restrictions.

Informal networks developed in response, as a way for women to practise medicine in secret – and pass on their medical wisdom outside the male bastions.

The Distaff Gospels, first published in France around 1480, is a collection of “gospels” around pregnancy, childbirth and health. It was created during secretive meetings of French women who had gathered with their drop spindles and distaffs to spin flax.

These women, who were mostly from the regions of Flanders and Picardy, agreed to meet over the long nights between Christmas and early February to gather the wisdom of their ancestors and pass it on to the women who came after them. The meetings are believed to have been organised by a local villager who selected six older women, each chairing one night, who would recount their advice on a range of topics such as pregnancy, childbirth and marriage.

A scribe was appointed to record the advice, which had previously only been preserved through the oral story tradition of peasant women. What is most fascinating is that although the text is mediated by a male scribe, The Distaff Gospels presents the often-silent voices of the lower working-class women. One such gospel advises:

Young women should never be given hares’ heads to eat, for fear they might think about it later, once they are married, especially while they are pregnant; in that case, for sure, their children would

Medieval women used informal social networks to share health problems and medical advice | Media Centre

In the medieval period, medical science was still dominated by the ancient writings of Hippocrates from the fifth century and Galen of Pergamon from the second century. Research has shown that women were increasingly being taken seriously as healers and as bearers of wisdom about women’s bodies and health. But despite this, men were preferred while women faced restrictions.

Informal networks developed in response, as a way for women to practise medicine in secret – and pass on their medical wisdom outside the male bastions.

The Distaff Gospels, first published in France around 1480, is a collection of “gospels” around pregnancy, childbirth and health. It was created during secretive meetings of French women who had gathered with their drop spindles and distaffs to spin flax.

These women, who were mostly from the regions of Flanders and Picardy, agreed to meet over the long nights between Christmas and early February to gather the wisdom of their ancestors and pass it on to the women who came after them. The meetings are believed to have been organised by a local villager who selected six older women, each chairing one night, who would recount their advice on a range of topics such as pregnancy, childbirth and marriage.

A scribe was appointed to record the advice, which had previously only been preserved through the oral story tradition of peasant women. What is most fascinating is that although the text is mediated by a male scribe, The Distaff Gospels presents the often-silent voices of the lower working-class women. One such gospel advises:

Young women should never be given hares’ heads to eat, for fear they might think about it later, once they are married, especially while they are pregnant; in that case, for sure, their children would have split lips.

‘Deviant women’

The advice

Medieval women used informal social networks to share health problems and medical advice – just as we do today

In the medieval period, medical science was still dominated by the ancient writings of Hippocrates from the fifth century and Galen of Pergamon from the second century. Research has shown that women were increasingly being taken seriously as healers and as bearers of wisdom about women’s bodies and health. But despite this, men were preferred while women faced restrictions.

Informal networks developed in response, as a way for women to practise medicine in secret – and pass on their medical wisdom outside the male bastions.

The Distaff Gospels, first published in France around 1480, is a collection of “gospels” around pregnancy, childbirth and health. It was created during secretive meetings of French women who had gathered with their drop spindles and distaffs to spin flax.

These women, who were mostly from the regions of Flanders and Picardy, agreed to meet over the long nights between Christmas and early February to gather the wisdom of their ancestors and pass it on to the women who came after them. The meetings are believed to have been organised by a local villager who selected six older women, each chairing one night, who would recount their advice on a range of topics such as pregnancy, childbirth and marriage.

A scribe was appointed to record the advice, which had previously only been preserved through the oral story tradition of peasant women. What is most fascinating is that although the text is mediated by a male scribe, The Distaff Gospels presents the often-silent voices of the lower working-class women. One such gospel advises:

Young women should never be given hares’ heads to eat, for fear they might think about it later, once they are married, especially while they are pregnant; in that case, for sure, their children would have split lips.

‘Deviant women’

The advice

Rethink period-pushing pills, reduce training intensity and alter diet during cycles: Menstrual health advice for women wrestlers | Sport-others News

Lighter training workloads during periods, four different week-wise dietary patterns based on the menstruation cycle and avoiding period-pushing pills altogether are some of the changes India’s women wrestlers are incorporating to tackle the tricky challenge of training during periods.

A thoughtful and scientific approach to menstrual health of female wrestlers is helping many prevent injuries that occur due to brittle bones – a result of calcium loss.

Dr Samuel Pullinger is the head of Sports Science at the JSW’s Inspire Institute of Sport, a training centre at Vijayanagar, Karnataka, where the country’s top wrestlers are camped. His team is helping women in combat sports train smarter and harder without compromising on health, he told The Indian Express.

Hansaben Rathore, a 19-year-old, from Depalpur, Indore, went through extremes as a young teen while training in her small town, with absence of knowledge, during her periods.

Wrestling Dr Samuel Pullinger is the head of Sports Science at the JSW’s Inspire Institute of Sport, a training centre at Vijayanagar, Karnataka, where the country’s top wrestlers are camped.

“At my first centre, I was told not to land up at practice at all during periods because there was a God’s idol in the room. And at my second centre, the coach would say, “achha, problem hai? koi nahi,” and ask me to ignore cramps and pain and continue training at full tilt,” she recalls.

Festive offer

There was little discussion because she felt awkward. But after 6 months, the period pain became unbearable. “Muscle injuries happen because you feel weak. The other option of not training at all also wasn’t right as practice stopped. Here at IIS, our diet for every week is planned keeping in mind the cycle, and training on the first two days of the period is lighter,” she explains.

Rathore has competed during

UN says Taliban is restricting Afghan women from working, seeking health care

The Taliban are restricting Afghan women’s access to work, travel and health care if they are unmarried or don’t have a male guardian, according to a UN report published Monday.

In one incident, officials from the Vice and Virtue Ministry advised a woman to get married if she wanted to keep her job at a health-care facility, saying it was inappropriate for an unwed woman to work, said the report from the UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan.

The Taliban have barred women from most areas of public life and stopped girls from going to school beyond the sixth grade as part of harsh measures they imposed after taking power in 2021, despite initially promising more moderate rule.

They have also shut down beauty salons and started enforcing a dress code, arresting women who don’t comply with their interpretation of hijab, or Islamic headscarf.

Dress code, male guardian crackdown

In May 2022, the Taliban issued a decree calling for women to only show their eyes and recommending they wear the head-to-toe burqa, similar to restrictions during the Taliban’s previous rule between 1996 and 2001.

Asked for Secretary-General Antonio Guterres’ reaction to the latest bans, UN spokesperson Stephane Dujarric replied: “Horror!”

“It must be unimaginable to have to live there,” he said.

WATCH | Afghan women say their hopes for the future are disappearing: 

Fear grows for women, girls in Afghanistan 2 years after Taliban takeover

Afghan women say their hopes for the future are disappearing as the country marks two years since the Taliban took control of the country, imposing ever more strict Islamic laws and codes of conduct on the population.

In its latest quarterly report, covering October to December last year, the UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan said the Taliban are cracking down on Afghan women who are single

40 Best Workout Clothes for Women 2024, According to Fitness Trainers

Gym attire has come a long way from its humble T-shirt-meets-spandex-bottoms origins, and the best workout clothes for women today have to meet a variety of standards before they can claim a prime spot in your rotation. Your activewear must be versatile and high-quality enough to handle wherever your wear it—while still making you feel like your best self.

From exercising to lounging to finishing a ’fit, the best women’s workout clothes keep pace with your life. “I believe activewear has a purpose for each workout,” says Tatiana Lampa, a NASM-certified personal trainer and creator of the Training With T app. “But I also believe in athleisure. I want to be able to pair my workout top with a cute jean jacket, or wear my black shiny leggings out to dinner.” Marissa Miller, an ACE-certified personal trainer, agrees on versatility being the biggest consideration of all. “I look for workout clothes I can live in outside of the gym,” she says. “Realistically, I’m running around doing errands or meeting up with friends directly before or after workouts, so my clothes have to move seamlessly with my lifestyle.”

Our top picks for women’s workout clothes

How to shop for the best workout clothes for women

Your go-to workout leggings and sports bras should be substantial enough to support high-impact exercises like running or HIIT circuits and comfy enough for lower-impact activities like yoga, pilates, hiking, or walking. Among the dozens of trainers Glamour spoke to, the majority recommended looking for workout clothing made from quick-drying, breathable, and moisture-wicking fabrics; synthetic polyester and nylon are ideal sweat-wicking materials because they evaporate and leave you feeling drier and cooler for workouts. Plus, styles with smart design features like hidden pockets and drawcords; and supportive compression.

What are the best workout clothing

How four Kenyan women found justice

By Dorcas WangiraAfrica health correspondent, BBC News, Nairobi

BBC Three of the women who won their forced sterilisation case in KenyaBBC

Four women living with HIV in Kenya have each been awarded $20,000 (£16,000) in damages for being sterilised without their informed consent. They have spoken to the BBC about their experiences.

The women fought a nine-year legal battle – and their names have been changed to protect their identities, which were not revealed during the case at the High Court.

“It has ruined my life,” Penda told the BBC about the surgery she underwent shortly after having twins at the state-owned Pumwani Maternity Hospital in the capital, Nairobi.

The procedure is called a bilateral tubal ligation (BTL) – when a woman’s fallopian tubes are cut, tied, burned, clipped or partly removed, closing them and preventing future pregnancies.

The father of her twins left before they were born. Her husband had died a few years earlier of HIV-related complications. She is distressed that she will never find another partner: “Who will marry me if they know I can’t give birth?”

Penda knew she was HIV-positive when she became pregnant so had sought medical advice. At the time, pregnant women with HIV were encouraged to give birth by caesarean section and to not breastfeed their babies to prevent mother-to-child transmission of the virus.

These are expensive routes to go down for many from poorer backgrounds. Nowadays most maternity care in Kenya is free. But it has not always been the case.

After giving birth, Penda says she was told to exclusively use formula milk. She says she was assured she was entitled to get free food for herself and the babies, but only if she showed proof that she was using family planning.

“As a single mother, that shocked me. I was already struggling with stigma. I didn’t know what else to

13 Best Work Clothes Stores for Women in 2024

We all spend a lot of time at work. By some estimates, up to one-third of our lives will unfold behind our desks. My fashion editor’s takeaway is that finding the best stores for work clothes is a not-insignificant part of career satisfaction—at least on a day-to-day, meeting-to-meeting basis. If you’re dressing for your office that often, it had better be in high quality, highly luxurious apparel.

We deserve to spend our 90,000-odd cumulative hours at work in outfits we love and that reflect the most professional interpretation of our personal styles. These days, work outfits can still embody the traditional definition of professional, while more flexible office dress codes allow us to get experimental. The best work clothes stores allow us to make the most of dressing for the office no matter how our personal-professional style manifests. We can still shop for the best work pants and blazers at the likes of J.Crew and COS, but we can also embrace avant-garde twists from Tibi, or exude corner office energy with quiet luxury takes from Max Mara and Toteme. All these designers have the look and feel to be taken seriously in a boardroom; at the same time, their pieces arrive in color palettes and silhouettes that feel refreshingly not corporate.

Ahead, I’ve curated the 13 best work clothes stores for a 9-to-5 wardrobe you’ll want to wear for years on end. I’ve tested pieces at the Bazaar offices from every brand on this list; I’ve also consulted reviews from well-dressed women in various professions. Read on to find a career uniform you’ll love enough to wear wherever your career journey takes you.


Best store for high-low styling: COS

Twisted Hoop Earrings

COS Twisted Hoop Earrings

Here’s an open secret direct from the Bazaar offices: All of my most stylish coworkers get their

Canadian brand Brunette the Label creates clothing to empower women

Founder discusses how collection embodies “Babes Supporting Babes” plus what’s next for brand

Article content

Brunette the Label (BTL) launched almost 10 years ago as a Vancouver showroom with one staple sweatshirt that read “Brunette is the New Black.” That sweatshirt garnered enough attention to persuade founder Miriam Alden to jump into the fashion business head first and at warp speed. 

What started as comfy, inclusive basics and sweat sets has morphed into an all-out Canadian fashion powerhouse brand, with outerwear, satin sets, holiday knits and accessories all launching this season.

Advertisement 2

Back To Top