Tag: save

‘Digitising’ your wardrobe can help you save money and make sustainable fashion choices

Spring is traditionally the season for a good clean – and maybe a clear out. Taking stock and having a bit of a declutter can freshen things up domestically.

One popular new way of doing this involves targeting your wardrobe by making digital inventories of your clothes – and then tracking what you wear. You note the price, brand and category of your garments (and shoes and bags) and then record how much use they get.

The idea is that having this information can then lead to better choices in the future, whether that’s saving money or having a more sustainable approach to fashion.

And better choices are needed. The clothing industry in Europe is ranked fourth in terms of its detrimental environmental impact after housing, transport and food.

Clothing is heavily underused, with the number of times a garment gets worn reportedly decreasing by 36% globally between 2000 and 2015. In the UK it has been estimated that 65% of women and 44% of men have clothing in their wardrobe which they are yet to wear, while one survey found that many women consider garments worn once or twice to be “old”.


Quarter life, a series by The Conversation

This article is part of Quarter Life, a series about issues affecting those of us in our twenties and thirties. From the challenges of beginning a career and taking care of our mental health, to the excitement of starting a family, adopting a pet or just making friends as an adult. The articles in this series explore the questions and bring answers as we navigate this turbulent period of life.

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How better and cheaper software could save millions of dollars while improving Canada’s health-care system

Billions of Canadian tax dollars have been funnelled to private companies to develop proprietary medical software. More tax dollars were then paid to the same companies to use the software to run our medical system.

This might not have seemed like a big deal at a time when Canadians could easily get a doctor and our medical system had one of the best doctor-patient ratios in the world.

Fast forward to today, when one-fifth of Canadians cannot find a doctor and more than half “battle” for appointments. You can now easily spend an entire day waiting when you visit the emergency room. Wait time for surgeries and diagnostic tests such as MRIs are much longer now, and over 17,000 Canadians died waiting for health care in 2023.

The once-great Canadian health-care system is being pushed to its limits, and as a result, is “failing.” Add Canada’s recent population growth into the equation, and you have an under-resourced system that is stretched too thin.

The health system might be better prepared for these challenges if literally billions of dollars had not been squandered on proprietary software development. A new study I wrote with my colleague Jack Peplinski at Western University shows how embracing open-source development saves millions and could help rescue Canada’s broken health-care system.

Undoing waste

A woman in a white coat and stethoscope with an iPad
On top of the cost of development, with proprietary software, each doctor’s office as well as each hospital has to pay for its own electronic health record licence.
(Shutterstock)

Although the Canadian federal government has invested over $2.1 billion developing health information technology (HIT), all 10 provinces still have their own separate HIT systems. Besides being an obvious source of redundancy and waste, these systems:

  • do not work together,
  • are expensive and
  • are inconsistent.

After first

Amazon Fashion Introduces AI-Powered Fit Finder To Get Sizes Right And Save On Returns

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos famously said, “We’re not competitor obsessed, we’re customer obsessed. We start with what the customer needs and we work backwards.”

The company’s latest move to standardize clothing sizes across the platform and help customers find their best fit is a perfect example of putting that philosophy into practice.

First and foremost it’s good for customers, but it also is good for the company and its many fashion vendors.

High Cost Of Returns

Last year, the National Retail Federation reported retailers processed $743 billion in returns last year, nearly 15% of total retail sales, with the volume frontloaded in the first quarter of the year.

The bigger the retailer, the greater the impact. Plus the return rate is even higher for online purchases, 18% of sales versus 10% for in-store purchases. That makes returns an even greater headache for Amazon
AMZN
, the nation’s second largest retailer than it is for number one Walmart
WMT
, which only generates about 15% of sales online.

Further complicating the returns picture is that clothing items are much more likely to be returned than other products. The NRF doesn’t put numbers to it, but Coresight Research estimates nearly one-fourth of online apparel purchases are returned.

Problems with size and fit account for over half of all fashion returns with the common practice of bracketing orders by buying an item in multiple sizes adding to it.

The high rate of fashion returns does a number on fashion retailers’ bottom line. The combined costs of shipping, processing and restocking can amount to about 66% of the price of the product, according to reverse logistics firm Optoro.

Ounce Of Prevention

Because an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, Amazon has introduced

Can home care save Quebec’s struggling health system? – Montreal

Family physician Dr. Eveline Gaillardetz worked all day, but didn’t set foot in a clinic or hospital on Friday. She worked in her car and at the homes of her patients in Verdun.

“I think now the new generation of doctors, they see how home care can save the health-care system,” Gaillardetz told Global News as she drove to a private seniors home where she has multiple patients.

Gaillardetz is part of a team of 15 doctors and nurses at the Verdun CLSC known as SIAD (Soins intensifs à domicile).

They visit palliative care patients approaching the end of life so they won’t have to go to an overcrowded ER. There’s a doctor on call 24/7.

“It’s a very demanding practice, but it’s a beautiful practice too,” the physician said.

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She received calls repeatedly in the two hours Global News spent with her on Friday.

“Without even having to send him to the emergency, we could provide the care that this patient needs at home,” she said after getting off one call.

Health authorities said this week that many seniors are showing up to emergency departments these days. It’s a problem that is likely to get worse in the years to come.


Click to play video: 'Can at home care ease the burden on Quebec ERs?'


Can at home care ease the burden on Quebec ERs?


“We know that we’re at the beginning of that new trend of having a very old population,” said Gaillardetz.


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Quebec’s Golden Age Federation (FADOQ) wants to see SIAD, and home care in general, expanded.

“The state of palliative home care in Quebec is really deplorable,” said FADOQ government relations director Philippe Poirier-Monette.  “Nearly 80 per cent of the Quebec population dies at hospital. In the UK, it’s about 50 per cent

Changing how you view fast fashion could save you money long-term





Nina Dragicevic, The Canadian Press







Published Tuesday, December 12, 2023 11:12AM EST




Danielle Cosentino used to give bags of unwanted clothes to her cousin every year.

While her cousin loved the free stuff, Cosentino grew tired of buying so much and wearing so little. She had become caught up in acquiring trends through fast fashion retailers only to realize she was locked in a loop of buying cheap clothes, having them degrade quickly, then having to buy more.

“I’ve always been told if you haven’t worn it in two years, then it should go,” says Cosentino, a massage therapist and nutritionist. “And I felt like that would be half my closet.”

A variety of studies and sources go even further than that, estimating that most of us don’t wear 70 to 80 per cent of our clothes.

Averaging out census data over several years, Canadian households spend roughly $300 a month on clothing, according to Statistics Canada. If most of that will be barely worn, our closets are essentially graveyards of disposable income.

Cosentino wanted to change. She hired Jaclyn Patterson, a personal wardrobe stylist and founder of  Shopwise, an online sustainable fashion retailer that focuses on “slow fashion.”

Cosentino began evolving her shopping habits and treating her wardrobe like a long-term investment, which she describes as a “psychological shift.” Even packing for vacations is easier now, as she’s learned how to build outfits and re-wear classic pieces in different ways.

“Yes, you will spend more on sustainable brands, for obvious reasons, but they’re timeless pieces and they really take you the distance,” Cosentino says. “In the long run, you actually spend less. Now I see the value in spending on quality, well-made pieces that aren’t

Changing how you view fast fashion could save you money long-term





Nina Dragicevic, The Canadian Press







Published Tuesday, December 12, 2023 11:12AM EST




Danielle Cosentino used to give bags of unwanted clothes to her cousin every year.

While her cousin loved the free stuff, Cosentino grew tired of buying so much and wearing so little. She had become caught up in acquiring trends through fast fashion retailers only to realize she was locked in a loop of buying cheap clothes, having them degrade quickly, then having to buy more.

“I’ve always been told if you haven’t worn it in two years, then it should go,” says Cosentino, a massage therapist and nutritionist. “And I felt like that would be half my closet.”

A variety of studies and sources go even further than that, estimating that most of us don’t wear 70 to 80 per cent of our clothes.

Averaging out census data over several years, Canadian households spend roughly $300 a month on clothing, according to Statistics Canada. If most of that will be barely worn, our closets are essentially graveyards of disposable income.

Cosentino wanted to change. She hired Jaclyn Patterson, a personal wardrobe stylist and founder of  Shopwise, an online sustainable fashion retailer that focuses on “slow fashion.”

Cosentino began evolving her shopping habits and treating her wardrobe like a long-term investment, which she describes as a “psychological shift.” Even packing for vacations is easier now, as she’s learned how to build outfits and re-wear classic pieces in different ways.

“Yes, you will spend more on sustainable brands, for obvious reasons, but they’re timeless pieces and they really take you the distance,” Cosentino says. “In the long run, you actually spend less. Now I see the value in spending on quality, well-made pieces that aren’t

Changing how you view fast fashion could save you money long-term





Nina Dragicevic, The Canadian Press







Published Tuesday, December 12, 2023 11:12AM EST




Danielle Cosentino used to give bags of unwanted clothes to her cousin every year.

While her cousin loved the free stuff, Cosentino grew tired of buying so much and wearing so little. She had become caught up in acquiring trends through fast fashion retailers only to realize she was locked in a loop of buying cheap clothes, having them degrade quickly, then having to buy more.

“I’ve always been told if you haven’t worn it in two years, then it should go,” says Cosentino, a massage therapist and nutritionist. “And I felt like that would be half my closet.”

A variety of studies and sources go even further than that, estimating that most of us don’t wear 70 to 80 per cent of our clothes.

Averaging out census data over several years, Canadian households spend roughly $300 a month on clothing, according to Statistics Canada. If most of that will be barely worn, our closets are essentially graveyards of disposable income.

Cosentino wanted to change. She hired Jaclyn Patterson, a personal wardrobe stylist and founder of  Shopwise, an online sustainable fashion retailer that focuses on “slow fashion.”

Cosentino began evolving her shopping habits and treating her wardrobe like a long-term investment, which she describes as a “psychological shift.” Even packing for vacations is easier now, as she’s learned how to build outfits and re-wear classic pieces in different ways.

“Yes, you will spend more on sustainable brands, for obvious reasons, but they’re timeless pieces and they really take you the distance,” Cosentino says. “In the long run, you actually spend less. Now I see the value in spending on quality, well-made pieces that aren’t

Changing how you view fast fashion could save you money long-term





Nina Dragicevic, The Canadian Press







Published Tuesday, December 12, 2023 11:12AM EST




Danielle Cosentino used to give bags of unwanted clothes to her cousin every year.

While her cousin loved the free stuff, Cosentino grew tired of buying so much and wearing so little. She had become caught up in acquiring trends through fast fashion retailers only to realize she was locked in a loop of buying cheap clothes, having them degrade quickly, then having to buy more.

“I’ve always been told if you haven’t worn it in two years, then it should go,” says Cosentino, a massage therapist and nutritionist. “And I felt like that would be half my closet.”

A variety of studies and sources go even further than that, estimating that most of us don’t wear 70 to 80 per cent of our clothes.

Averaging out census data over several years, Canadian households spend roughly $300 a month on clothing, according to Statistics Canada. If most of that will be barely worn, our closets are essentially graveyards of disposable income.

Cosentino wanted to change. She hired Jaclyn Patterson, a personal wardrobe stylist and founder of  Shopwise, an online sustainable fashion retailer that focuses on “slow fashion.”

Cosentino began evolving her shopping habits and treating her wardrobe like a long-term investment, which she describes as a “psychological shift.” Even packing for vacations is easier now, as she’s learned how to build outfits and re-wear classic pieces in different ways.

“Yes, you will spend more on sustainable brands, for obvious reasons, but they’re timeless pieces and they really take you the distance,” Cosentino says. “In the long run, you actually spend less. Now I see the value in spending on quality, well-made pieces that aren’t

Why ditching fast fashion never goes out of style, and can save money in the long run

Danielle Cosentino used to give bags of unwanted clothes to her cousin every year.

While her cousin loved the free stuff, Cosentino grew tired of buying so much and wearing so little. She had become caught up in acquiring trends through fast fashion retailers only to realize she was locked in a loop of buying cheap clothes, having them degrade quickly, then having to buy more.

“I’ve always been told if you haven’t worn it in two years, then it should go,” says Cosentino, a massage therapist and nutritionist. “And I felt like that would be half my closet.”

A variety of studies and sources go even further than that, estimating that most of us don’t wear 70 to 80 per cent of our clothes.

Averaging out census data over several years, Canadian households spend roughly $300 a month on clothing, according to Statistics Canada. If most of that will be barely worn, our closets are essentially graveyards of disposable income.

Cosentino wanted to change. She hired Jaclyn Patterson, a personal wardrobe stylist and founder of  Shopwise, an online sustainable fashion retailer that focuses on “slow fashion.”

Cosentino began evolving her shopping habits and treating her wardrobe like a long-term investment, which she describes as a “psychological shift.” Even packing for vacations is easier now, as she’s learned how to build outfits and re-wear classic pieces in different ways.

“Yes, you will spend more on sustainable brands, for obvious reasons, but they’re timeless pieces and they really take you the distance,” Cosentino says. “In the long run, you actually spend less. Now I see the value in spending on quality, well-made pieces that aren’t going to make it into a garbage bag.”

As a stylist seeing clients in Toronto and remotely, Patterson has worked with celebrities, Olympians and executives, analyzing

Gen Z now renting clothes to save some money and the planet

SOMERVILLE – Gen Z’ers are leading the way in a growing trend in fashion. They are flocking to clothing rental services to bump up their back-to-the-office wardrobes while saving money and the planet.

For Maya Freed of Somerville, the whole experience feels like Christmas once a month when her box arrives from Nuuly

“You see the things online and then you see them in person and it’s the best feeling in the world,” she said. “For the next month, this stuff is mine!”

For $98 a month, renters can choose six pieces from an online selection of thousands of items from brands like Anthropologie, Urban Outfitters, Free People and Levi’s.

“I got this sparkly long sleeve for a disco cowboy western themed birthday party,” Maya explained. “Then I got to send it right back.”

After a month, users zip up the case and ship it back to Nuuly and wait for a new box to arrive. 

“It’s all stuff that I truly never would have purchased otherwise, and the best part about it is that I feel like I’m doing something good because they send you clothes that other people have worn.”

For Maya, the freshly dry-cleaned clothing that has been already loved by another user means less guilt over the impact fast fashion has on the environment.

According to Princeton University, the fashion industry is responsible for more annual carbon emissions than all the international flights and maritime shipping combined.

It is an issue that is on the top of Nuuly executives minds.

“The tote itself is reusable,” explained Sky Pollard of Nuuly. She said each zippered delivery tote is used for about 40 round trips. “That’s saving so many cardboard boxes,” Pollard told WBZ.

She said they are also conscious of using as many environmentally gentle cleaning

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