Tag: possibly

Costco to new offer weight-loss program possibly including Ozempic

Costco and its low-cost health care partner are expanding into weight-loss management.

Costco will begin offering its members in the U.S. access to a weight loss program through Sesame, a health care marketplace, Sesame exclusively told USA TODAY. The service, which will cost $179 every three months, is scheduled to become available April 2.

“We are witnessing important innovations in medically supervised weight loss,” said David Goldhill, Sesame‘s co-founder and CEO. “Sesame’s unique model allows us not only to make high-quality specialty care like weight loss much more accessible and affordable but also to empower clinicians to create care plans that are specific to − and appropriate for − each individual patient.”

Last fall, Costco began offering $29 visits with a primary care physician through its partnership with Sesame. It also offered virtual mental health therapy for $79 a session and health checkups with a standard lab panel and virtual follow-up consultation with a provider for $72.

The expansion into medical weight loss services by Sesame with Costco came as a result of inquiries from patients, Goldhill told USA TODAY.

“The No. 1 search term of Costco members seeking primary care on Sesame was around weight loss,” Goldhill said.

Both parties got together about two months after the primary care doctor partnership started to begin looking into offering weight loss management because consumers were coming to Sesame “unprompted and saying ‘What do you have?’ ” he said.

How does Costco’s weight loss program work?

This is what’s included for $179 every three months for Costco members:

  • Three months of clinical consultation.
  • Ability to select the clinician of your choice.
  • An initial live video consultation with the clinician.
  • Ability to message your clinician outside scheduled appointments.
  • A nutritional guide and recommendations.
  • An individualized, clinically appropriate treatment program.

Sesame clinicians will begin

Social media influencers give inaccurate, possibly harmful sexual health advice

January 20, 2023

2 min read


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Social media influencers who offered sexual health advice often provided unreliable information, highlighting the need for teenagers to critically evaluate the information they receive online, according to researchers.

Many young people get information about sexual health from social media, often from influencers or microcelebrities who have many followers. Since previous research has found that social media influencers have “powerful persuasive effects on attitudes and behaviors,” Emily J. Pfender, MA, a PhD student and instructor in the department of communication at the University of Delaware, and M. Marie Devlin, an MA student in the department of communication at the University of Delaware, wrote that it is important to assess how influencers convey sexual health information about topics like birth control.



The AMA advised the FDA to make birth control pills OTC drugs instead of prescription. Source: Adobe Stock

Social media influencers who offered sexual health advice often provided unreliable information, highlighting the need for teenagers to critically evaluate the information they receive online, according to researchers. Source: Adobe Stock

“Getting sexual health information from social media gives young adults the opportunity to get peer perspectives and seek out relatable information,” Pfender said in a press release. “It is an especially good way for underrepresented groups such as LGBTQ+ young adults to get tailored sexual health information. It is important, however, that young people critically evaluate the health information they receive on social media and the source

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