Tag: Experts

Mental health experts advice in the wake of the Chiefs Parade Shooting

TO HELP YOU START THAT CONVERSATION ON PEOPLE ALL AROUND KANSAS CITY ARE COMING TO TERMS RIGHT NOW WITH THE PARADE SHOOTING, AND SO ARE OUR KIDS. THIS IS HARD. THIS ISN’T SOMETHING THAT WE WANT TO TALK ABOUT. WE HAVE TO AFTER WEDNESDAY’S CHAOTIC AND DEADLY ENDING TO THE SUPER BOWL PARADE, THERE’S A LOT OF EMOTION. JOHNSON COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH CALLS INCREASED 10% IN THE LAST 24 HOURS. I THINK IT’S REALLY IMPORTANT THAT WE’RE CHECKING IN WITH EACH OTHER. OUR LOVED ONES, THOSE AROUND US, AND IF YOU START TO NOTICE WITHIN YOURSELF OR WITH YOUR OTHERS, YOUR OTHER LOVED ONES, THAT THEY’RE STRUGGLING IN SOME WAY OR SOMETHING’S CHANGED, IF THERE’S CHANGES IN SLEEP HABITS OR MORE ANXIETY OR TEMPERS RUN HIGH AND CONTINUE FOR THE NEXT FEW WEEKS, IT’S TIME TO GET HELP. THE SAME APPLIES TO CHILDREN. START WITH HAVING A GENTLE CONVERSATION. WHAT I WOULD WANT TO TELL MY SIX YEAR OLD IS, GOSH, THAT’S SUCH A TOUGH QUESTION. THAT IS REALLY HARD AND THAT MAKES ME FEEL REALLY UNCOMFORTABLE. I BET THAT THOUGHT MAKES YOU FEEL REALLY UNCOMFORTABLE TOO, HUH? TELL ME ABOUT THAT. AS PARENTS HAVE TO CHECK IN WITH THEMSELVES FIRST AND SAY, HOW AM I FEELING ABOUT THIS? THERE’S A MIX OF FEELINGS, RAGE, ANGER, SADNESS. YES, GUILT. SHAME. ALL THE THINGS. AND IF WE CAN CHECK IN WITH OURSELVES FIRST, OUR KIDDOS ARE SPECIALLY FEELING THAT TOO. THE BIGGEST THING IS, RIGHT NOW WE ARE ALL SEEKING A CONNECTION. SO REACH OUT TO SOMEONE IN SOME WAY.

Mental health experts advice in the wake of the Chiefs Parade Shooting

After Wednesday’s chaotic – and deadly – ending to the Super Bowl Parade, there’s a lot of emotion across the metro.

“This

ChatGPT passes the nutrition test, but experts remain irreplaceable

In a recent study published in the journal Nutrients, researchers evaluated the potential of chat generative pretrained transformer (ChatGPT) to provide nutritional guidance.

Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are the foremost cause of mortality, accounting for 74% of deaths globally. The 2019 global burden of diseases study estimated there were 43.8 million cases of type 2 diabetes (T2D), 1.2 billion cases of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and 18.5 million cases of hypertension. Obesity prevalence has almost tripled between 1975 and 2016.

Various studies have consistently underscored the impact of lifestyle and dietary factors on NCD onset and progression. Of late, internet searches for information on health-related queries have been increasing. ChatGPT is a widely used chatbot that generates responses to textual queries. It can comprehend the context and provide coherent responses.

ChatGPT has emerged as an accessible and efficient resource for medical advice seekers. Chatbots can deliver real-time, interactive, personalized patient education and support, helping improve patient outcomes. Nevertheless, data on the utility of ChatGPT to improve nutrition among NCD patients have been limited.

Study: Is ChatGPT an Effective Tool for Providing Dietary Advice?Study: Is ChatGPT an Effective Tool for Providing Dietary Advice?

The study and findings

In the present study, researchers compared the nutritional advice provided by ChatGPT with recommendations from international guidelines in the context of NCDs. Analyses were performed using the default ChatGPT model (version 3.5). The team included medical conditions requiring specific nutritional treatments, such as arterial hypertension, T2D, dyslipidemia, obesity, NAFLD, sarcopenia, and chronic kidney disease (CKD).

A set of prompts for these conditions, formulated by doctors and dieticians, was used to obtain dietary advice from the chatbot. Separate chat sessions were conducted for each prompt conversation. ChatGPT’s responses were compared with recommendations from international clinical guidelines. Two dieticians independently assessed and categorized ChatGPT’s responses. Responses were deemed “appropriate” if they aligned with the

Glaucoma Awareness Month: Medical expert’s advice on how to prevent vision loss from Glaucoma

Glaucoma, often referred to as the “silent thief of sight,” is a serious eye condition that can lead to irreversible vision loss. In an effort to raise awareness about this prevalent eye disease, the month of January has been designated as Glaucoma Awareness Month. This observance aims to educate the public about the importance of regular eye check-ups, early detection, and preventive measures to safeguard vision.

Here’s a guide on how to prevent glaucoma and why awareness is crucial.

What is Glaucoma?

Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases characterised by damage to the optic nerve, often caused by elevated intraocular pressure. The optic nerve is essential for transmitting visual information from the eye to the brain. If left untreated, glaucoma can lead to permanent vision loss and, in severe cases, blindness.

Risk Factors for Glaucoma

1. Age: The risk of developing glaucoma increases with age, especially after the age of 40.

  

2. Family History: A family history of glaucoma raises an individual’s susceptibility.

3. Race: People of African, Hispanic, and Asian descent are at a higher risk.

4. Medical Conditions: Conditions such as diabetes and hypertension can contribute to the development of glaucoma.

5. Eye Trauma or Surgery: Previous eye injuries or surgeries may increase the risk.

6. Prolonged Steroid Use: Long-term use of corticosteroids can elevate intraocular pressure.

Preventive Measures for Glaucoma

1. Regular Eye Exams: Comprehensive eye exams, including measuring intraocular pressure and assessing the optic nerve, are vital for early detection.

2. Know Your Family History: Being aware of your family’s eye health history helps in understanding potential risks.

3. Maintain a Healthy Lifestyle: A balanced diet, regular exercise, and avoiding smoking can contribute to overall eye health.

4. Protect Your Eyes: Use protective eyewear when engaging in activities with potential eye hazards.

5.

How experts expect artificial intelligence to advance health care in 2024

Researchers says AI could save hundreds of human hours during clinical studies, among other things

The rise of technologies such as ChatGPT has thrust artificial intelligence into the spotlight throughout 2023 — and health care is no exception.

“With the increasing availability of health-care data and the rapid progress in analytic techniques — whether machine learning, logic-based or statistical — AI tools could transform the health sector,” the World Health Organization said when it launched a set of regulatory recommendations in October.

As we move into 2024, here are some key AI developments — and cautions — that will be top of mind for Canadian experts in the new year and beyond.

Personalized patient care

One of the most exciting potential developments in health-care AI is harnessing the ability of a computer model to process and interpret “multi-modal” data about a patient, said Roxana Sultan, chief data officer and vice-president of health at the Toronto-based Vector Institute dedicated to AI research.

Right now, AI models can make a diagnosis based on one or two pieces of information, such as an X-ray, Sultan said. That’s achieved by training the model on “tons and tons of X-ray images” so it learns to recognize certain diagnoses.

“That is fantastic. But that is (only) one source of information,” Sultan said.

In the “near future,” she said, machine learning will develop so that AI can take a “much more comprehensive look at patient health.”

In addition to a patient’s X-ray, for example, AI would be able to process other data, including doctor’s notes, lab samples, medications the patient is taking and genetic information.

That ability will not only play a critical role in diagnosing a patient, but also in coming up with a more personalized treatment plan, Sultan said.

“When you have models that understand

8 longevity experts on creating healthy habits to help you age well

With every turn of the calendar year comes a slew of pledges to sleep more, get moving, and shape up. But longevity and aging experts are looking at the old-school concept of New Year’s resolutions differently. The key to a longer, healthier life isn’t reaching a number on a scale. Instead, they say, to focus on building the habits that contribute to slowing the aging process and improving your overall well-being. Here, eight leaders in longevity share their 2024 health goals and their best advice for how to reach yours.

What goals do you have for the New Year to prioritize your health?

More ‘me time’

“Balancing the roles of an entrepreneur and mother to two boys, my daily priorities include integrating mindfulness and meditation practices to manage stress, optimizing sleep quality for effective rejuvenation, and introducing more strength training into my routine,” says Melanie Goldey, CEO of Tally Health. “While maintaining social relationships is also important to overall well-being and longevity, I am also prioritizing ‘me time’ to ensure I have opportunities to relax and recharge.”

Prioritize social connection

“This year, I’m focusing on cultivating habits that enhance my well-being, like meditation and spending quality time with the people we love,” says Dr. Shoshana Ungerleider, an internal medicine physician and founder of End Well, a non-profit focused on end-of-life care.

Break out of a workout rut

“I am prioritizing improving my diet. No one eats a perfectly healthy diet, and I’m definitely one of them, but I strive to be healthier,” says Dr. Anthony Youn, author of Younger for Life. “I am prioritizing more diverse exercise in 2024. I can get stuck in a rut with exercise, doing some of the same things over and over (like running) so I’m going to mix it up

How experts expect artificial intelligence to advance health care in 2024

Researchers says AI could save hundreds of human hours during clinical studies, among other things

The rise of technologies such as ChatGPT has thrust artificial intelligence into the spotlight throughout 2023 — and health care is no exception.

“With the increasing availability of health-care data and the rapid progress in analytic techniques — whether machine learning, logic-based or statistical — AI tools could transform the health sector,” the World Health Organization said when it launched a set of regulatory recommendations in October.

As we move into 2024, here are some key AI developments — and cautions — that will be top of mind for Canadian experts in the new year and beyond.

Personalized patient care

One of the most exciting potential developments in health-care AI is harnessing the ability of a computer model to process and interpret “multi-modal” data about a patient, said Roxana Sultan, chief data officer and vice-president of health at the Toronto-based Vector Institute dedicated to AI research.

Right now, AI models can make a diagnosis based on one or two pieces of information, such as an X-ray, Sultan said. That’s achieved by training the model on “tons and tons of X-ray images” so it learns to recognize certain diagnoses.

“That is fantastic. But that is (only) one source of information,” Sultan said.

In the “near future,” she said, machine learning will develop so that AI can take a “much more comprehensive look at patient health.”

In addition to a patient’s X-ray, for example, AI would be able to process other data, including doctor’s notes, lab samples, medications the patient is taking and genetic information.

That ability will not only play a critical role in diagnosing a patient, but also in coming up with a more personalized treatment plan, Sultan said.

“When you have models that understand

Control antibiotic misuse or the drugs won’t work, warn WHO experts

Copenhagen, 23 November 2023

WHO recognizes antimicrobial resistance (AMR) as 1 of the 10 major global public health threats, with an estimated 5 million deaths annually associated with bacterial AMR worldwide. More than half a million of these deaths occur in the WHO European Region, which comprises 53 Member States in Europe and central Asia.  

AMR occurs when microorganisms develop the ability to resist the antimicrobial drugs that are typically used to kill them and treat infections. Different types of antimicrobials – such as antibiotics for bacteria, antivirals for viruses and antifungals for fungi – target specific types of microorganisms. While AMR is a natural phenomenon, the development and spread of superbugs are being accelerated by the misuse of antimicrobials, rendering infections more challenging to treat effectively.  

The alarming reality is that, without immediate intervention, AMR could result in up to 10 million deaths a year by 2050. Moreover, this burden falls disproportionately on low- and middle-income countries, exacerbating global health inequalities. 

New data 

WHO/Europe has conducted a standardized survey across more than a dozen countries of the WHO European Region, namely in the Western Balkans, the Caucasus and central Asia (including Türkiye), shedding light on the knowledge, attitudes and behaviours surrounding antibiotic use and AMR. The survey is the first of its kind to be conducted in these countries, all of which gave the research their full support. 

The results have been published in the journal Frontiers. The survey used the same methodology and questions as an established survey that is periodically carried out in the European Union (EU). Conducting surveys in this way, in close collaboration with the European Commission, enables WHO to achieve its goal of having a pan-European overview. This clear picture of the current situation makes it possible to monitor progress and evaluate interventions in

Experts concerned over ‘pseudoscience’ on social media

A concerned woman checks her smart phone while standing in a streetShare on Pinterest
Experts say mental health advice on social media platforms should be scrutinized carefully. Ivan Pantic/Getty Images
  • Online social platforms have increased visibility and discussion around mental health topics.
  • Not all mental health information shared online is necessarily accurate, evidence-based, or even well-intentioned.
  • Experts say people with mental health issues may be especially vulnerable to this type of messaging.

Anyone can create a TikTok account.

For the purposes of staying connected with friends and family, this can be a simple and effective tool.

However, as you might expect — or may have already experienced firsthand — this also means that not everything shared on TikTok is based in fact.

The same applies to other popular social platforms such as Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook, and X (formerly known as Twitter).

In a new book edited by Jonathan N. Stea and Stephen Hupp, a panel of professionals examines the potential dangers of seeking mental health advice and treatments online, and in particular on social media platforms and celebrity sites.

What are the specific dangers, and what can be done to avert them? Here’s what experts have to say.

“I use TikTok and often witness mental health issues being shared and discussed on the platform,” Andrea Tarantella, LPC, NCC, a counselor with ADHD Advisor who was not involved in the book, told Medical News Today.

“I see anecdotal advice and personal experiences being shared that often oversimplify how complex mental health issues are. Individuals then self-diagnose with conditions such as ADHD and autism in the comments section, simply relying on one personal experience posted by the content creator,” said Tarantella.

While personal anecdotes certainly have the potential to be true, experts say they shouldn’t be applied broadly or mistaken as definitive.

Experts also caution against content that promotes immediate results

With thousands of N.W.T. evacuees in Alberta, local experts fear impact of toxic drug crisis

A small group of health-care workers in Alberta is working to inform wildfire evacuees from the Northwest Territories about where to access common medications for opioid-use disorder in Calgary and Edmonton.

Missing even a day of medications causes withdrawal symptoms, while several days without increases the risk of relapsing for otherwise stable patients — which means more people at risk of dying from the toxic street drug supply, says Dr. Kate Colizza, an addiction medicine and internal medicine physician in Calgary.

“It’s not the type of medication where a lot of people can plan ahead or have extras available,” said Colizza, who created fliers listing opioid agonist therapy (OAT) clinics and programs in the two cities.

“The issue with a lot of these medications — like Suboxone, methadone, Kadian — is that … you have to go to the pharmacy every day to pick up and take your medication.”

Thousands of people have fled Yellowknife and surrounding First Nations since last week, filling evacuation centres in Calgary, Edmonton, and surrounding areas. In the middle of a toxic drug crisis that killed at least 7,328 people across Canada last year, experts and advocates fear displacement due to wildfires could lead to more toxic drug poisonings and deaths. 

Colizza and her colleagues began putting together information for the fliers as soon as they heard evacuees would be arriving in Alberta. The goal is to make it easier for people to access care when they do not have an Alberta health plan and physicians cannot access their health records. 

After she shared the information on social media, Colizza said advocates on the ground started printing out the fliers and distributing them at evacuee reception centres. 

Petra Schulz, co-founder of Moms Stop the Harm, said the

TikTok users prefer health guidance from influencers over medical experts: study – Doha News

As TikTok videos featuring popular influencers peddle health advice, a new study spotlights alarming trends, prompting urgent calls for integrating credible medical information into the digital landscape.

In an era where social media apps are shaping global discourse, a recent study by Washington State University (WSU) has thrown a spotlight on a critical issue.

TikTok is playing a pivotal role in influencing how users perceive and engage with health-related content, and the findings are as captivating as they are alarming.

According to the study, published in the Journal of Health Communication, TikTok’s predominantly young audience has a marked predilection for health-themed content delivered by their favourite influencers. The research points out that topics revolving around sexual health, diet, and exercise invariably go viral, while other significant health issues are largely ignored.

“Most of these videos weren’t providing attainable steps for behaviour change,” Nicole O’Donnell, Assistant Professor of Communications at WSU and the study’s lead author, said. “Instead, they’re sharing aesthetic details of what is often a highly unobtainable lifestyle.”

The research team, comprising of communications doctorate students, analysed videos from TikTok’s #EduTok campaign to glean a comprehensive understanding of user engagement.

They found an unsettling lack of audience interaction with mental health videos. Moreover, pertinent topics such as substance abuse prevention, bullying, and sexual violence prevention were conspicuously absent, despite being highly relevant to the platform’s teenage demographic.

Videos featuring influencers portraying the “role model” persona, as well as those deterring people from certain behaviours through shock value, garnered the highest engagement. However, these videos were found to be light on substantive information and deficient in promoting achievable behavioural changes.

A particularly disturbing trend highlighted by the study was the profusion of videos encouraging self-diagnosis of mental health conditions.

“Videos of people self-diagnosing their depression, anxiety, or other issues related

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