Tag: answer

Can AI answer medical questions better than your doctor?

Illustration of woman with brown hair looking at computer screen with healthcare symbol and chatbot robot; concept is AI in healthcare

Last year, headlines describing a study about artificial intelligence (AI) were eye-catching, to say the least:

At first glance, the idea that a chatbot using AI might be able to generate good answers to patient questions isn’t surprising. After all, ChatGPT boasts that it passed a final exam for a Wharton MBA, wrote a book in a few hours, and composed original music.

But showing more empathy than your doctor? Ouch. Before assigning final honors on quality and empathy to either side, let’s take a second look.

What tasks is AI taking on in health care?

Already, a rapidly growing list of medical applications of AI includes drafting doctor’s notes, suggesting diagnoses, helping to read x-rays and MRI scans, and monitoring real-time health data such as heart rate or oxygen level.

But the idea that AI-generated answers might be more empathetic than actual physicians struck me as amazing — and sad. How could even the most advanced machine outperform a physician in demonstrating this important and particularly human virtue?

Can AI deliver good answers to patient questions?

It’s an intriguing question.

Imagine you’ve called your doctor’s office with a question about one of your medications. Later in the day, a clinician on your health team calls you back to discuss it.

Now, imagine a different scenario: you ask your question by email or text, and within minutes receive an answer generated by a computer using AI. How would the medical answers in these two situations compare in terms of quality? And how might they compare in terms of empathy?

To answer these questions, researchers collected 195 questions and answers from anonymous users of an online social media site that were posed to doctors who volunteer to answer. The questions were later submitted to ChatGPT and the chatbot’s

‘The missing link’: is textile recycling the answer to fashion’s waste crisis? | Fashion

The sun is always shining in the Swedish seaside town of Sundsvall, according to the staff of Renewcell, the world’s first commercial-scale textile-to-textile recycling factory.

Renewcell’s enormous warehouse opened last year. It sits on the water’s edge, with easy access for the ships that deliver 400kg bales of shredded cotton and denim from textile waste sorters in Germany, Switzerland and Sweden. Inside the warehouse, the large rectangular bales are stacked in colossal fabric pyramids, each exploding with ribbons of navy blue and black fabric. The towering piles weigh 500 tonnes. Every month, the plant can take 10 times that amount and turn it into a material called Circulose. Circulose looks and feels like chalky craft paper, but it can be used to make viscose rayon (usually made from wood pulp) and, in turn, new clothes.

“Instead of sending [textile waste] to landfill or incineration, we want to pick it up and be that circularity,” says Patrick Lundström, the CEO of Renewcell. “We see ourselves as the missing link in the fashion industry.”

A textile delivery awaits treatment at Renewcell
A drop in the ocean … a textile delivery awaits treatment at Renewcell. Photograph: Felix Odell

The opening of the plant could not come soon enough. The question of what to do with the mountains of textile waste produced by the fashion industry is increasingly pressing. Images of used garments strewn across the beaches of Ghana and the dunes of the Atacama desert in Chile highlight the truth of waste colonialism – the practice of big waste producers such as the UK offloading their waste on to poorer countries without effective waste management – and reveal how overproduction has rendered piles of T-shirts, dresses and jeans worthless to charities and resellers.

But the 60,000 tonnes of textile waste Renewcell will be able to process by next year is

Do health care deals work? Feds overhauling data collection to help answer – National

In medicine, before a doctor treats a patient’s illness, they first try to get a sense of the person’s health.

They collect information on the symptoms, run tests and blood work and gather whatever details they can.

That way, they’ll know whether or not the medicine has worked.

It’s called establishing a baseline, and policy experts do the same thing to figure out if their latest strategy has actually fixed the problem.

When it comes to fixing Canada’s ailing health-care systems, governments have often failed to set that baseline – so it’s difficult to know how well the treatment has worked, said Haizhen Mou, a professor with University of Saskatchewan Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy.

She launched a research project to study whether past health accords between federal and provincial governments have made meaningful differences in the quality and availability of health care in Canada, but ran into trouble almost immediately.

Story continues below advertisement

“What I’m trying to figure out is whether we can find comparable data to conduct a meaningful evaluation of the impact of those health accords,” Mou said.

“So far, the answer is no.”


Click to play video: 'Premiers agree to accept Ottawa’s health funding offer: ‘A step in the right direction’'


Premiers agree to accept Ottawa’s health funding offer: ‘A step in the right direction’


Successive federal governments have attempted to measure the impact of the cash they inject into provincial and territorial health systems over the years by demanding reports on specific indicators. Every new deal has led to incremental improvements in health-data collection over the years, said Mou.

This time, the government is looking to create a complete picture of the system by overhauling the way Canada collects and shares health data.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau offered provinces and territories $46 billion in new spending over the next 10 years to address the health crisis that unfolded in the

Did past health accords work? Ottawa is trying to make that question easier to answer

In medicine, before a doctor treats a patient’s illness, they first try to get a sense of the person’s health.

They collect information on the symptoms, run tests and blood work and gather whatever details they can.

That way, they’ll know whether or not the medicine has worked.

It’s called establishing a baseline, and policy experts do the same thing to figure out if their latest strategy has actually fixed the problem.

When it comes to fixing Canada’s ailing health-care systems, governments have often failed to set that baseline — so it’s difficult to know how well the treatment has worked, said Haizhen Mou, a professor with University of Saskatchewan Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy.

She launched a research project to study whether past health accords between federal and provincial governments have made meaningful differences in the quality and availability of health care in Canada, but ran into trouble almost immediately.

“What I’m trying to figure out is whether we can find comparable data to conduct a meaningful evaluation of the impact of those health accords,” Mou said. “So far, the answer is no.”

Successive federal governments have attempted to measure the impact of the cash they inject into provincial and territorial health systems over the years by demanding reports on specific indicators. Every new deal has led to incremental improvements in health-data collection over the years, said Mou.

This time, the government is looking to create a complete picture of the system by overhauling the way Canada collects and shares health data.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau offered provinces and territories $46 billion in new spending over the next 10 years to address the health crisis that unfolded in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic.

In exchange, provinces must create measurable goals they hope to accomplish with the funds,

Back To Top